» Differences between web 2.0 and bubble 2.0 ?

Differences between web 2.0 and bubble 2.0 ?

For me, the big thing about web 2.0 is the amateur revolution.

Easy to publish

2.0: anybody can publish its content text, photos and videos very easily, as easy as sending an email.

1.0: was too complicated, home page builders, hosting and too much html code. News is simplicity.

Discoverable

2.0 amateurs can get their content known easily and for some of them reach a broad audience thanks to the efficiency of search engines enabling the long tail.

1.0 search engines were sending most of of their audience to the mass news sites and already known brands such as CNN and the like. Now amateur content has the same voice or even a louder one in some cases.

Control of your own data

2.0 your content belongs to you (like in Second Life) and you can export it or get it back easily (like in Flickr, Typepad)

1.0 when you upload your data the sites own it and don’t let you get it back.

Joi says that sites that do not repect this last point belong to the bubble 2.0 and that YouTube is one of these as there is no way to export easily your video, unlike eyespot or blop.tv.

How about web 3.0, what is it for you ? Here is a tentative. I should try to get him to speak at LeWeb3 to explain us better.



  • http://frazer.rice.edu/~erkan/blog/archives/001840.html Erkan’s field diary

    “Blogs More Trusted Than TV Ads in Europe

    Scotsman.com reports (thx LexBlog Blog) that a Ipsos MORI study has found that Europeans trust blogs more than television ads or email marketing. Newspapers were still more trusted than blogs. 52% also said they were persuaded to make a purchase…

  • http://www.ThinkStudio.com xavier comtesse

    Direct Economy: Customer knowledge is replacing producer knowledge
    By Xavier Comtesse, mathematician, ThinkStudio.com
    Globalisation, delocalisation, mobility and work flexibility take centre stage in the media world, creating a climate charged with fears. Despite this, a potentially more destabilising phenomenon is emerging: direct economy.
    What is it exactly?
    Combinations of four factors are generating a very different economy. The arrival of the consumer into the value chain – changing production processes; the disappearance of intermediaries which leave the door open for new forms of intermediation; the appearance of new business models; and finally price setting which follows the bidding trend. By acting together, these four elements of direct economy are upsetting and deeply transforming the old economy.
    Some examples and explanations are necessary to grasp how much this metamorphosis is about to transform our vision of the economy.
    Since IKEA, Easyjet, DELL, E*Trade and many others have offered consumers participation in the production process, especially in the product’s end phase, we understand that the value chain is in a restructuring period. Indeed, by joining in the chain, the consumer fully participates in the creation process; he is the key element because without his intervention, there would be no finished product. When IKEA entrusts the final stages of transport and ‘setup’ of a piece of furniture to its customers, there is, in a sense, a transfer because IKEA outsourced part of its production. Thanks to this mode, IKEA relinquished two costly processes – delivery and setup; and can thereby offer its customers price cuts, because of how much it has increased its external productivity. This is the central reading key to these new processes.
    Easyjet, DELL and E*Trade don’t act any differently. It is obvious that products which were shaped by the consumer’s active participation cannot be sold differently anymore. Therefore, the value creation chain has been profoundly affected, and this permanently. It’s under that angle that direct economy must be approached
    “It’s a background revolution which implicates revisiting the way the economy is understood. ”
    Obviously, classic intermediaries such as tradesmen aren’t satisfied, because the consumer will have tendency to circumvent them to find himself directly in contact with the producer. In the meantime, a new form of intermediation is being set up. E*Trade, eBay and many other direct economy companies have been forced to open a new type of “shop”. These shops are primarily learning centres, and operate more like ‘Internet cafés’ than classical training rooms. Tutors meet participants who are in auto-apprenticeship. This collective, organised as an interest community, will function like an enlarged competence network. Intellectual exchange and apprenticeship is free, but the motor for cooperation is success for all. We can imagine what effect this will have on our schools and universities if they were to function along the lines of such a business model! Intermediation leaves behind the more informational form (information/price/quality/after-sales), aiming towards the more formative (formation/bidding/completion/practical community).
    New business models are therefore starting to supplant the older ones. It is not about looking for “low cost” in production, but for “high productivity” in the consumer. By inversing values, these companies create a move towards the customers’ know-how. All that is basic knowledge information becomes free, and all that is complex knowledge must be paid for. In a sense we are leaving an economy founded on producers’ knowledge for a customer knowledge economy. It is a background revolution which implicates revisiting the way we understand the economy. When Skype made Internet communications free, it demolished the telecommunications’ industry’s economic model. Also, when the three, mp3, iPod, iTunes appeared on the market, the music industry was shaken up. Without doubt this economical evolution will take over in the future, and that’s only a beginning.
    If we observe eBay and its model of fixing prices through bidding, we notice that even the mechanism of price fixing changes. eBay is the largest virtual shop in the world. Customers exchange not only their used products, but tens of thousands of small specialised shops offer all sorts of new merchandise, a sort of huge online bazaar. The owners of these small shops are real professionals who live off these transactions and are organising tomorrow’s shopping world, because everything is sold without price or negotiation but by bids. This practise is totally new for consumers, who were never before in a situation which makes them state a price in the hope of winning a bid. In the old economy, we were never used to fixing a price for merchandise which could also be coveted by others at a different price, and which could then be sold to the highest bidder. This situation necessitates apprenticeship first, but also leads to fundamental changes in consumers’ behaviour. The question is to know whether the consumers will be able to come back to the old form of buying when they have familiarised themselves with and got used to these new practises. We could make some bets.
    This change in price setting will probably entail an important economic mutation towards what we can today qualify as direct economy.
    To conclude, I would like to propose a risked analogy with direct democracy. When Switzerland pushed the democratic concept as far as to offer governing tools to the people, such as the initiative and the referendum, the Swiss invented direct democracy. Are we not at the dawn of a new type of invention on the economic scale? If real power is given to consumers, meaning finishing the product, cancel out the intermediaries, change models and fix prices, are we not already modifying the bases of the economy?

  • http://www.berufsblog.de Bloggerin

    Web 2.0 or Bubble 2.0?
    What an interesting question? Indeed it’s not so easy to describe what web 2.0 really means. Sometimes I have the impression that everything is web 2.0 at the moment and a lot of people uses this expression although they don’t kow exactly what they mean. It’s like bubble! A few days ago I read about web 3.0! What’s coming next?
    Best wishes from Germany

  • http://altmilan.blogspot.com Milan Davidovic

    The title indicates a comparison between Web 2.0 and Bubble 2.0, but the post itself compares (Web) 2.0 with (Web) 1.0.
    Are Web 2.0 and Bubble 2.0 so different from each other? Perhaps they’re more like each other than they are their 1.0 counterparts.

  • http://www.costhost.net/own-cost-web-host/ Own Cost Web Host

    Own Cost Web Host

    own cost web host In order to host your own site, however, you need to At the low end, an ISDN

  • http://www.costhost.net/1-web-host-cost/ 1 Web Host Cost

    1 Web Host Cost

    Total Web Host offers web designers and Virtual server technology is a cost effective solution t

  • dlxcell

    We have for sale all Brands & Models Of Nextel & GSM Cell Phones, Computers & Laptops, Ipod Nanos,Digital Cameras & camcorders & General Electronics at very Subsidized & Unbeatable Prices. All Phones are Brand New T2 Euro specs,Factory unlocked,sim-free,no operator logo, sealed in their original factory box, We sell in Wholesales and any quantity of your choice. We offer free shipping on all bulky orders and orders from 8 units.Note All phones comes with the complete accessories & manuals with 1 full year international warranty. DO CONTACT US THROUGH OUR COMPANY EMAIL… dlxcell@hotmail.com,dlxcell@yahoo.com
    Nokia N95……..$300usd
    Nokia N93……..$250usd
    Nokia N75……..$270usd
    Nokia 7610…….$100usd
    Nokia 8800…….$140usd
    Nokia N70……..$150usd
    Nokia N90……..$180usd
    Nokia N91……..$200usd
    Nokia N92……..$220usd
    Nokia N71……..$155usd
    Nokia N80……..$210usd
    Nokia 9300…….$145usd
    Nokia 9500…….$170usd
    Nokia E60 …….$160usd
    Nokia E61 …….$180usd
    BenQ-Siemens EF81— $130
    BenQ-Siemens EF91— $130
    BenQ-Siemens EL71— $140
    BenQ-Siemens M81— $140
    BenQ-Siemens P51— $150
    Sidekick 1………..$100usd
    Sidekick 2………..$120usd
    Sidekick 3………..$150usd
    Motorola razor v3……….$130usd
    Motorola razor v3 pink…$140usd
    Motorola v3x…………….$135usd
    Motorola MPX100………$120usd
    Motorola MPX300………$115usd
    Nextel i930……..$130usd
    Nextel 1960 ……$130usd
    Nextel i870……..$120usd
    Nextel i860……..$110usd
    Sony Ericsson P800…..$150usd
    Sony Ericsson W900i….$190usd
    Sony Ericsson W850i….$170usd
    Sony Ericsson W950i….$250usd
    Sony Ericsson P900…..$200usd
    Sony Ericsson P980i….$180usd
    Sony Ericsson P990…..$230usd
    Sony Ericsson S600i….$135usd
    Sony Ericsson V800i….$155usd
    Sony Ericsson W800i….$160usd
    Treo 600……………$150usd
    Treo 650……………$160usd
    Treo 700w………….$200usd
    Play Station 1…….$100usd
    Play Station 2…….$140usd
    Xbox 360…………..$160usd
    Apple iPod 60 GB video……………………..$150usd
    Apple iPod 30 gb……………………………..$60usd
    Apple 20 GB iPod Nano……………………..$60usd
    Apple 4 GB iPod Mini Pink M9435LL/A….$70usd
    Apple 40 GB iPod photo……………………$80usd
    Apple 4 GB iPod Mini Silver M9160LL/A..$70usd
    Apple 60 GB iPod Photo M9830LL/A……$100usd
    Apple 60 GB iPod photo ……………………$55usd
    Apple 30 GB iPod Photo M9829LL/A……$95usd
    Apple 512 MB iPod ShuffleMP3 Player…$50usd
    Apple 4 GB iPod Mini Blue M9436LL/A…$70usd
    Apple 2 GB iPod Nano………………………$90usd
    Apple 30 GB iPod Vidoe……………………$110usd
    Panasonic TH-42PWD8UK 42 in Flat Panel Plasma TV…………..$300usd
    Pioneer PureVision PDP-5060HD 50 in Flat Panel Plasma TV…..$450usd
    Panasonic TH-42PHD8UK 42 in Flat Panel Plasma TV……………$350usd
    Panasonic Onyx TH50PX500U 50 in Flat Panel Plasma TV………$450usd
    Sony BRAVIA XBR KDL-V32XBR1 32 in Flat Panel LCD TV…..$300usd
    Sony Wega KDF-E50A10 50 in LCD Rear-Projection TV……….$400usd
    Sony Wega KDL-V40XBR1 40 in Flat Panel LCD TV…………….$350usd
    Sony Wega KD-36FS130 36 in Flat Screen TV……………………$350usd
    Sony WEGA SXRD KDS-R50XBR1 50 in Rear-Projection LCoS TV…$400usd
    Sony Grand WEGA KDF-E55A20 55 in LCD Rear-Projection TV…….$450usd
    Sony Grand WEGA KDF-E60A20 60 in Rear-Projection LCD TV…….$550usd
    Sony Grand WEGA KDF-E55A20 55 in LCD Rear-Projection TV…….$500usd
    Sharp Aquos LC-37D7U 37 in Flat Panel LCD TV……$350usd
    Sharp Aquos LC-26DA5U 26 in\’ LCD TV………………$250usd
    Sharp Aquos LC-45GD7U 45 in Flat Panel LCD TV….$400usd
    Sharp Aquos LC-20S4U 20 in Flat Panel LCD TV…….$200usd
    Sharp Aquos LC45GD4U 45 in Flat Panel LCD TV…….$300usd
    Sharp Aquos LC-45GX6U 45 in Flat Panel LCD TV……$450usd
    Samsung HP-R4252 42 in Flat Panel Plasma TV………$400usd
    Samsung HL-R5067W 50 in Rear-Projection DLP TV….$400usd
    Samsung LN-R268W 26 in Flat Panel LCD TV…………..$250usd
    Samsung HL-R4667W 46 in Rear-Projection DLP TV…..$350usd
    Samsung LN-R268W 26 in Flat Panel LCD TV…………..$300usd
    Samsung SlimFit TX-R3079WH 30 in Flat CRT TV………$300usd
    Samsung HL-R5688W 56 in Rear-Projection DLP TV…..$500usd
    Samsung HLR5078W 50 in Rear-Projection DLP TV……$450usd
    For more details contact,DO CONTACT US THROUGH OUR COMPANY EMAIL…..
    dlxcell@hotmail.com
    dlxcell@yahoo.com